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Accused Cop Killer Eric Frein Appears in Court


Kena Betancur/Getty Images(MILFORD, Pa.) -- Accused cop killer Eric Frein made his first court appearance Friday, looking gaunt and his face bruised, as he was arraigned on murder charges in Milford, Pennsylvania.

Frein, who police say shot two state troopers on Sept. 12 before fleeing into the woods, had a gash on his nose and was booed outside the courthouse by locals, including one woman who yelled, "You're lucky we didn't get you during hunting season."

Other angry spectators shouted "coward" and "scumbag" as Frein, 31, remained stone-faced.

He did not enter a plea.

"We have now started to find the answers that the community desires in this case," District Attorney Raymond Tonkin said outside the courthouse. "The families in this matter...have suffered an unimaginable loss of unspeakable proportions. They will never be the same but today we find some comfort."

Tonkin has said he will seek the death penalty for Frein.

Frein was captured by U.S. Marshals on Thursday evening outside an abandoned hangar in the Pocono Mountains, in the area where police have been hunting for the suspect for nearly seven weeks.

"A team was sweeping through the area, surprised him as he was outside of the hangar," Pennsylvania State Police Lt. Col. George Bivens said Friday.

He said the cut on Frein's face is not the result of a battle with police.

"That was an injury that occurred to him sometime in his flight," Bivens said.

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Kaci Hickox Ordered to Stay at Least 3 Feet from Anyone


ABC News(FORT KENT, Maine) — The state of Maine has been granted a temporary court order restricting the movements of Kaci Hickox.

A judge in Augusta has told her she must agree to active monitoring, coordinate her travel with health authorities, not be present in public places, not leave Fort Kent and stay at least 3 feet from anyone when she does go out.

This is short of the blood test the governor had mentioned and short of a mandated quarantine, but there will be some sort of agreement or more substantive order later Friday.

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What Eric Frein Searched for on His Computer Before Manhunt


Courtesy Roman Kamensky(MILFORD, Pa.) -- Accused cop killer Eric Frein had planned out his efforts to avoid capture and did research online about how police would be able to track him, an affidavit released on Friday reveals.

Investigators had Frein's computer searched after he shot two state troopers on Sept. 12 and they were able to find specific Internet searches that showed he was plotting for months.

"SWAT raid tactics" and "police raid training" were both searched in April, according to the affidavit. "Can police track cell phones," "police manhunt guide" and "how to escape a manhunt" were all searched in early May.

He clearly thought about the long haul as well. He looked up information about "caching food" and "tips on placing caches." A cache is a small duffle-type bag that hunters and survivalists use to store food in hidden places, which is a tactic Frein is believed to have used.

Though the affidavit states that there were other Internet searches, the earliest one listed in the document was a search that he made on Nov. 7, 2012 -- nearly two years before the shooting -- for "ballistics trajectory calculator."

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It's About Time: The Clock that Keeps the Entire US Ticking


Linda Davidson / The Washington Post via Getty Images(WASHINGTON) -- You may be looking forward to catching an extra hour of shut-eye this Sunday as most of the country prepares to roll their clocks back an hour for Daylight Saving Time, but have you ever wondered where time actually comes from?

ABC News/Yahoo! News ventured to the U.S. Naval Observatory in search of answers.

Situated atop a hill overlooking much of Washington, D.C., the observatory is perhaps best known as the home of the vice president’s mansion, but it is also home to the nation’s master clock.

Every time you turn on your cellphone or plug an address into your car’s GPS, you are actually communicating with the Naval Observatory.

“Everything is tied in to the master clock here,” Naval Observatory’s Public Affairs Officer Geoff Chester explained during a recent tour. “So, if you use anything that remotely touches GPS as a timing source, then you are essentially getting your time from us.”

Chester explained how the job of keeping the nation on time is a whole lot more complicated than counting up from “one-Mississippi.”

“We now use a particular frequency of an atom,” Chester said. “It's essentially a microwave resent frequency, and a second is now defined as the interval of 9,192,631,770 hyperfine transitions of the ground state of a neutral caesium 133 atom.”

The 9,192,631,770 atomic intervals that measure a second is the basic building block of time as it is measured today.

In addition to watching the clock, the Naval Observatory has long played a role in keeping an eye on the sky. Chester showed ABC News/Yahoo! News a telescope that was built in 1893 to observe a particular type of star called “double stars,” which appear close to each other when seen from Earth.

“Double stars make up about two-thirds of the population of all the stars that you can see in the sky,” Chester said. “So, it's very important for us to understand how these components of these double stars move relative to each other, so we can properly get our guidance sensors pointing at the right things.”

One of the most interesting aspects of the telescope, which is not computer-controlled as many modern ones are, has nothing to do with the operation of the telescope itself.

If you stand in the middle of the domed room that houses the telescope and look up, there is no apparent way to reach the telescope, which is elevated above at the ceiling’s height -- until Chester hits a button and the entire floor begins to elevate to reach the telescope above.

“We believe this is the largest elevator in the city,” Chester said, as the floor made its ascent.

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NTSB Waiting to Inspect Plane in Wichita Airport Crash


Jaison Podkanowicz(WICHITA, Kan.) — Investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board have been unable to inspect a small plane that crashed into a building at an airport in Wichita, Kansas, killing four people.

Leah Yeager, a senior air safety investigator with the NTSB, said late Thursday investigators will enter the Flight Safety Building at Wichita Mid-Continent Airport after it's deemed structurally sound.

The twin-engine Beechcraft lost power in one of its engines during takeoff Thursday morning before crashing into the building, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. Its pilot, Mark Goldstein, a former air traffic controller, died.

"I need to declare an emergency. We just lost the left engine," Goldstein told air traffic controllers before the crash.

The three others killed, who were in the building, haven't been identified. Five people were hospitalized, including one person in serious condition. Goldstein was flying solo.

About 100 people were inside the building, which houses Cessna Citation Jet Simulators, when the plane crashed.

"We were on a conference call and the building just kind of shook and rumbled," said Ryan Peterman, who works inside the building. "We saw the fuselage of the aircraft on top of the building on fire."

Goldstein, who served in the U.S. Navy before joining the FAA in 1987, twice earned the top safety award for his region as an air traffic controller, according to the National Air Traffic Controllers Association. He had recently retired.

"I knew the air traffic control people would know if it was him and sure enough, they knew his voice," said Ron Ryan, a friend of Goldstein.

A 2005 bio provided to ABC News described Goldstein as someone who has “an extensive background in aviation and is considered to be a conscientious controller.” He also volunteered as a youth hockey coach.


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Eric Frein Shackled with Slain Trooper's Handcuffs After Capture


Pennsylvania Department of Transportation(TANNERSVILLE, Pa.) — A self-trained survivalist was shackled in the handcuffs used by a Pennsylvania state trooper he allegedly killed in an ambush last month, the state police commissioner said during a news conference.

U.S. Marshals captured Eric Frein outside an abandoned hangar at Birchwood-Pocono Airport near Tannersville, Pennsylvania, about 6 p.m. Thursday, State Police Commissioner Frank Noonan said.

"They ordered him to surrender, to get down and raise his hands," he said.

Frein, 31, was then placed in the handcuffs used by Cpl. Bryon Dickson, who was killed in the Sept. 12 shooting at the barracks in Blooming Grove, said Noonan. He was then driven in Dickson's police vehicle to those same barracks and held there until he was moved to the Pike County Correctional Facility overnight.

"He was definitely taken by surprise," Noonan said, adding that Frein had no weapons on him when he was captured.

Pike County District Attorney Ray Tonkin said he plans to seek the death penalty against Frein, who is charged with first-degree murder, homicide of a law enforcement officer, attempted murder and possession of weapons of mass destruction.

First-degree murder and homicide of a law enforcement officer are both capital offenses. He will be arraigned at 9 a.m. Friday and may face more charges.

"This individual is no longer a threat to this community," said Tonkin.

An unidentified woman told the Scranton Times Tribune that Frein looked exhausted as he was led out of the woods by marshals. Outside of what Noonan called a "scratch" that he suffered before he was taken into custody, Frein appeared to be in good health. "Healthier than I would have expected," Noonan added.

For weeks, several thousand members of various departments in at least five states spent countless hours looking for Frein, who had been on the run since he allegedly killed Dickson, 38, and injured Trooper Alex Douglass during a late-night shift change at the barracks.

Douglass, 31, was discharged to a rehabilitation facility a few weeks ago, state police said.

"Eric Frein was dedicated to killing law enforcement," said Noonan. "I can't think of a more dangerous occupation than going out into those woods and looking for him."

The families of Dickson and Douglass were “relieved and grateful” for Frein's capture, said Noonan.

At times, 1,000 officers searched the rugged mountains for Frein, who police said had planned his attack and hiding for years. The lives of residents in the area were disrupted by the manhunt, including school closings and event cancellations.

Halloween celebrations were canceled because of the manhunt but local officials planned to try and salvage trick-or-treating.

Frein, from nearby Canadensis, was seen several times during the search and later added to the FBI's Most Wanted List.

“The reason this took so long is it’s such a big wooded area that he is thoroughly familiar with," said Noonan.

Police previously found two pipe bombs, an AK-47, ammunition and various food and supplies hidden in the woods while searching for Frein. Police haven't said whether they found the sniper rifle they believe he used in the ambush.

Frein was linked to the shooting after a man discovered his partly submerged SUV in a swamp a few miles from the barracks. Inside, investigators found shell casings matching those found at the barracks as well as his driver's license, camouflage face paint, two empty rifle cases and military gear.

Authorities said they later found notes in the woods, allegedly penned by Frein, which offered a "cold-blooded" and "chilling" account of the ambush and his escape into the woods.

"Got a shot around 11 p.m. and took it. He dropped. I was surprised at how quick," State Police Lt. Col. George Bivens said at a news conference on Oct. 8, reading from the note police believe Frein wrote. "I took a follow-up shot on his head-neck area. He was still and quiet after that."

Frein's criminal record appeared limited to a decade-old misdemeanor case involving items stolen from a World War II re-enactors event in upstate New York, for which he spent 109 days in jail.


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NC Man Pleads Guilty to Attempting to Aid ISIS


AndreyPopov/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(WASHINGTON) -- A North Carolina man who attempted to join the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria pleaded guilty to attempting to aid an international terrorist organization.

Donald Ray Morgan, 44, was arrested on Aug. 2 at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York on a federal indictment for possession of a firearm by a felon. Court documents showed that Morgan "knowingly attempted to provide support and resources" to ISIS from January 2014 through August 2014.

On at least one occasion, Morgan even tried to travel from Lebanon to Syria to join ISIS.

Assistant Attorney General for the Middle District of North Carolina called the plea a representation of "our continued commitment to confronting those who attempt to travel abroad to support terrorist organizations."

Morgan faces up to 15 years in prison and a $250,000 fine.

"Donald Ray Morgan proved himself to be a threat to national security," Special Agent in Charge John Strong of the FBI said Thursday. "American citizens who support terrorist organizations must be held accountable for their actions."

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Alleged PA Cop Shooter Eric Frein Captured Alive


Pennsylvania Dept of Transportation(CANADENSIS, Pa.) -- Accused cop killer Eric Frein, one of the FBI's 10 Most Wanted Fugitives, was captured after a 48-day manhunt, police said Thursday night.

"Eric Frein was dedicated to killing law enforcement members," Pennsylvania State Police Commissioner Frank Noonan said in a news conference with Gov. Tom Corbett. "I can't think of a more dangerous occupation than going out into those woods and looking for him."

Noonan said several thousand members of various departments in at least five states spent countless hours looking for Frein.

Frein, 31, was captured by U.S. Marshals at an abandoned airplane hanger at Birchwood-Pocono Airport near Tannersville about 6 p.m. Thursday, police said.

Frein had a sniper rifle and knives but no shots were fired during his capture, said Noonan. He was taken to the State Police barracks in Blooming Grove, the same place where he allegedly ambushed two state troopers.

Noonan said Frein was shackled with the handcuffs of Cpl. Bryon Dickson, who was killed in the shooting at the barracks, and driven there in the late officer's police vehicle.

The suspect was captured by a team of marshals who happened to spot him near the hanger. Frein gave up without a struggle and got down on his knees to be handcuffed when approached by the marshals, police said. The suspect was in good condition and required no medical attention.

Frein had eluded authorities since Sept. 12, when he allegedly killed one Pennsylvania state trooper and injured another during his attack on the barracks. At times, 1,000 officers searched the rugged mountains for Frein, who police said had planned his attack and hiding for years. The lives of residents in the area were disrupted by the manhunt, including school closings and event cancellations.

Police believed Frein, a self-trained survivalist from nearby Canadensis, had previously hidden supplies in the woods that he could draw from. They found two pipe bombs, an AK-47, ammunition and various food and supplies they believe belong to the suspect.

On Tuesday, police investigated a possible sighting of Frein made by a resident in Barrett Township, said Trooper Connie Devens, a spokesperson for the Pennsylvania State Police. It was one of several such sightings.

A Pennsylvania town had banned trick-or-treating this year while hundreds of cops search nearby woods for Frein. Barrett Township said its annual Halloween parade and 5K Scarecrow Race were canceled indefinitely, and trick-or-treating was banned this year. But township officials told ABC News Thursday night that there will be trick or treating on Friday though the parade won't happen.

Notes found in the woods, allegedly penned by Frein, offered a "cold-blooded" and "chilling" account of how he shot and killed the trooper last month before escaping into the forest, authorities said.

"Got a shot around 11 p.m. and took it. He dropped. I was surprised at how quick," Lt. Col. George Bivens said at a press conference Oct. 8, reading from the note police believe Frein wrote. "I took a follow-up shot on his head-neck area. He was still and quiet after that."

Police said they linked Frein to the ambush after a man walking his dog discovered his partly submerged SUV three days later in a swamp a few miles from the shooting scene. Inside, investigators found shell casings matching those found at the barracks as well as Frein's driver's license, camouflage face paint, two empty rifle cases and military gear.

His criminal record appeared limited to a decade-old misdemeanor case involving items stolen from a World War II re-enactors event in upstate New York, for which he spent 109 days in jail.

Frein is charged with first-degree murder and various other offenses, including two counts of possession of weapons of mass destruction filed after police discovered the pipe bombs. Pike County District Attorney Ray Tonkin said he'd seek the death penalty against Frein.

Trooper Alex Douglass was shot in the pelvis and critically injured in the ambush, which took place during a late-night shift change. Douglass remained hospitalized until Oct. 16, when he was discharged to a rehabilitation facility, state police said.

"If you attack troopers, and a civilized society, the Pennsylvania State Police will bring you to justice. Eric Frein is a coward," the Pennsylvania State Troopers Association said in a statement. "Cpl. Bryon K. Dickson II and Trooper Alex T. Douglass are true heroes."

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Saint Louis County Prosecutor Says Leaks Not Coming from Grand Jury in Michael Brown Case


tomloel/iStockphoto/Thinkstock(FERGUSON, Mo.) -- Saint Louis County Prosecutor Robert McCulloch released a statement on Thursday that leaks involving the case of an officer-involved shooting that left 18-year-old Michael Brown dead in August are not coming from the grand jury in the case.

"No information or evidence has been released by the grand jury," McCulloch's statement said. While he acknowledged a tweet from "several weeks ago" which claimed that a person serving on the grand jury had discussed the case with a friend, McCulloch says bluntly, "That did not happen."

"An investigation revealed that the account had, indeed, been hacked and the origin/author of the tweet is unknown," according to the statement.

McCulloch also denied recent reports that testimony and documents had been leaked "by or from the grand jury." He pointed specifically to reports in The New York Times, which said it received information from a government source briefed on the case, and the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, which said the documents they obtained did not come from the grand jury.

"Whoever is releasing this information is doing great disservice to the grand jury process," McCulloch concluded. Though he assured the public that "anyone suggesting that the 'integrity of the entire grand jury process has been destroyed' is wrong, irresponsible and does a great disservice to the public."

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At Least Four Dead in Small Plane Crash at Kansas Airport


Jaison Podkanowicz(WICHITA, Kan.) -- Four people are dead after a prop plane crashed into a building Thursday morning at an airport in Wichita, Kansas, officials said.

Five others have been rushed to a local hospital, fire marshal Brad Crisp said more than three hours after the crash.

"We don't know what may have caused the incident," Wichita Fire Department Chief Ron Blackwell said, noting that responders faced a "horrific firefight for several minutes."

The plane struck the top of the Flight Safety Building at Mid-Continent Airport shortly before 10 a.m. and approximately 100 people were inside at the time, according to airport officials.

Federal officials have confirmed that the incident is not related to terrorism.

The plane involved in the crash was a twin-engine Beechcraft that was taking off but lost power in one engine, according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Keith Rose, the CEO of Rose Aircraft Services Inc., which owned the plane, confirmed that the pilot was one of the fatalities. He was the only person on board. The three other fatalities were all individuals in the building, which housed Cessna Citation Jet Simulators.

Rose said that the plane was headed to Mena, Arkansas, "for painting and interior refurbishing work," and that the pilot was the only person onboard.

National Air Traffic Controllers Association President Paul Rinaldi said that the pilot was one of those killed in the crash, identifying him as recently retired veteran air traffic controller Mark Goldstein.

Airport officials reported on their Twitter feed that the building sustained serious damage with collapsed walls and ceilings. Smoke could be seen billowing from the building from miles away immediately after the crash.

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Talks with Ebola Nurse Fail, Maine Governor to Use 'Full Authority'


Handout Photo(AUGUSTA, Maine) -- Negotiations with nurse Kaci Hickox, who refuses to be quarantined after treating Ebola patients in West Africa, have "failed" and the governor of Maine will now "exercise the full extent of his authority," according to a statement from the governor's office.

Gov. Paul LePage didn't say whether that meant getting a court order to enforce Hickox's quarantine or forcing her to take an Ebola blood test. Earlier on Thursday, LePage indicated to ABC News that he would abandon his demand that Hickox remain under quarantine if she would agree to take a blood test for the lethal virus.

"I was ready and willing -- and remain ready and willing -- to reasonably address the needs of healthcare workers meeting guidelines to assure the public health is protected," LePage said.

The governor made his comment after Hickox defiantly challenged demands that she remain quarantined by leaving her home in Fort Kent Thursday morning for a bike ride with her boyfriend. She was trailed by a police car as she rode.

While Hickox was pedaling, attorneys for the state of Maine went to Superior Court seeking a judge’s permission to give Hickox a blood test for Ebola, LePage said.

“This could be resolved today,” the governor said. “She has been exposed and she’s not cooperative, so force her to take a test. It’s so simple.”

Medical experts have said that an Ebola test would only be positive if someone were symptomatic, and could register a negative result if the amount of Ebola virus in the blood hadn’t reached a detectable level.

LePage's office later put out a statement saying negotiations with Hickox had failed and the governor will now “exercise the full extent of his authority allowable by law.”

"Maine statutes provide robust authority to the state to use legal measures to address threats to public health," the statement said.

It added, "Specifics of the process or steps being taken by the state at this time may not be discussed publicly due to the confidentially requirements in law."

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More Than Half of US Bans Controversial Guardrail


iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) -- More than half the nation -- 27 states -- have now announced they are suspending further installation of a controversial guardrail system used on roads around the country following what critics said was a cover-up of a dangerous change in the guardrail’s design made nearly a decade ago.

A flood of states have announced suspension of new installation of the ET-Plus guardrail after a Texas jury found earlier this month that the guardrail maker, Trinity Industries, had defrauded the government by making modifications in 2005 and failing to tell federal or state transportation officials at the time. Trinity was ordered to pay some $175 million in damages -- an amount that’s expected to triple by statutory mandate.

Twenty-seven states have said they’ll no longer install the ET-Plus system, some latest states to join being Georgia and Trinity’s home state of Texas. One state, Virginia, said last week it is making plans to remove the guardrails from its highways, but would consider leaving them in place if Trinity can prove the modified version is safe.

The ET-Plus System was the subject of an ABC News 20/20 investigation in September that looked into allegations from crash victims that the modified guardrail can malfunction when struck from the front by their vehicles. Rather than ribboning out and absorbing the impact as designed, the guardrails “locked up” and speared straight through the cars, severing the motorists’ limbs in some cases.

According to an internal email obtained by ABC News, a company official estimated one particular change -- reducing a piece of metal in the guardrail end terminal from five inches to four -- would save the company $2 per guardrail, or $50,000 per year.

The Federal Highway Administration has given Trinity until Oct. 31 to submit plans to crash test the guardrail or face a nationwide suspension of its eligibility for sale. Some of the 28 states have said the ET-Plus ban is in place at least until results of those crash tests are available.

Trinity has maintained the guardrails are safe, noting that the Federal Highway Administration approved the modified guardrail for use after questions about the modifications were raised in 2012. The company plans to appeal the Texas verdict and has previously told ABC News it has a “high degree of confidence in the performance and integrity” of the ET-Plus system.

States that have taken action in regard to the ET-Plus system:

  • Arizona
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Hawaii
  • Idaho
  • Georgia
  • Louisiana
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Mississippi
  • Missouri
  • Montana
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Dakota
  • Oklahoma
  • Oregon
  • Texas
  • Utah
  • Vermont
  • Virginia
  • Washington
  • Wisconsin

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Michigan Woman Goes Missing After Halloween Party


Monroe County Sheriffs Office(MONROE, Mich.) -- A young Michigan woman, who vanished after an early Halloween party last weekend, was last seen in a parking lot with a man who has a thin black moustache and was wearing a black hooded sweatshirt, police said.

Chelsea Ellen Bruck was last seen leaving the party between 3 a.m. and 4 a.m. Sunday while dressed as the Batman character Poison Ivy.

Police in Monroe County, which is located in southeast Michigan, have issued a missing persons poster showing the normally blonde 22-year-old wearing her costume, which consisted of a top made of ivy leaves and a black wig that appeared red at the ends.

Police have also released a sketch of a man that they say was last seen with Bruck near where cars were parked outside of the party. The man was believed to have dark hair, a thin mustache and wearing a black hooded sweatshirt.

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San Francisco Giants Fans Celebrate World Series Title with Couch Fires


Ron Vesely/MLB Photos via Getty Images(SAN FRANCISCO) — Big crowds hit the streets of San Francisco late Wednesday to celebrate the Giants' third World Series title in five years.

People burned couches and other debris in the city's Mission District after the Giants defeated the Kansas City Royals 3-2 in the decisive Game 7.

Two people were shot in the Mission, police told ABC News station KGO-TV.

 

SF won the #worldseries. This guy is swinging on live wire on a bus. lol

A video posted by Tony Bell (@tb_tonybell) on Oct 10, 2014 at 10:29pm PDT

 

Police haven't said how many arrests were made.

 

I'm covered in beer #GoGiants #madbum

A video posted by Jeff Dean (@most_jeffinitely_) on Oct 10, 2014 at 8:49pm PDT

A victory parade is scheduled for Friday.

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Man Survives Driving Off Cliff, 17 Hours Trapped Underneath Vehicle


iStock/Thinkstock(BOONE, N.C.) — A man in North Carolina survived 17 hours pinned underneath his vehicle after he fell asleep behind the wheel and drove off a cliff, authorities said.

Joseph Woodring's vehicle fell at least 60 feet when he went off the road in Boone, N.C., on Tuesday night, according to State Highway Patrol.

The crash launched Woodring, 21, from his vehicle, which landed upside down and pinned him underneath it. He was found Wednesday afternoon.

"He was lying on his side. Both legs were pinned under," Dale Watson told ABC News affiliate WSOC-TV. "He wanted some water so I give him some water."

Watson said Woodring told him he fell asleep while driving. It took rescue crews an hour to raise the vehicle off him.

Woodring was taken to the hospital with two broken legs, according to the State Highway Patrol.


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